SAVORY BUTTERMILK CORNBREAD

 
Remember the old 
Southern saying, 
“If there’s sugar in the cornbread, 
there’s a Yankee  
in the kitchen!” 
My trusty iron skillet is older than dirt

If you’re looking for a sweet cornbread, you won’t find it here; in my way of thinking, real cornbread is not sweetThis is southern-style corn bread, plenty of buttermilk and sour cream, and not a touch of sugar.  This is some tasty cornbread ~ just ask Bubba...

He came by yesterday ~ game day ~ and brought the étouffée he made from scratch Saturday.  He has cooked it many times and it’s always a treat for us all.  Bubba filled it with a mixture of spices and plenty of shrimp and fresh crabmeat ~ it was absolutely delicious!

Back to the cornbread:  It’s about the iron skillet, stone-ground cornmeal, buttermilk and sugar-free.  This is simple basic cornbread with a great crisp crust on the outside.  




Cornbread is about texture:  I’ve mentioned stone-milled cornmeal here many times.  Stone-ground cornmeal contains the germ of the corn, giving it a coarser texture and a more intense corn flavor.  This kind of cornmeal has more nutritional value and flavor, but it spoils faster.  Store it in the refrigerator to prevent spoiling.   

Buttermilk makes every bite of cornbread moist and tender.  It imparts a noticeable tanginess to the bread...

This always reminds me of Grandma way back when.  She would find a nice browned piece of cornbread with the crisp edges.  She crumbled it into pieces and submerged them into a glass of cold buttermilk.  Grandma then pushed the cornbread chunks down and around with her spoon and then let it sit and soak for a minute.  It was lip-smacking good to her and her grin showed it.  

Sour cream increases the acidity level of cornbread, moistens it and lightens the color.  It softens and tenderizes the bread, holding it together firmly without crumbling when slicing the cornbread.

A cast iron skillet is one of the versatile cooking utensils.  It’s durable, conducts heat very well, and can do its job most anywhere, going from grill, to stovetop to oven.  It gets good and hot which makes the edges of the cornbread nice and crispy.  The drawbacks:  iron skillets are heavy and need to be taken care of, seasoned well. The benefits outweigh the negatives.



These are not laws for making cornbread, just my opinion ~ you can bake good cornbread without them, but follow this recipe if you want to a eat great cornbread!

Nothing beats a plateful of Bubba's étouffée and a slice of warm cornbread with a pat of butter melting on it…

Really good eating here yesterday ~ wish you were here!

SAVORY BUTTERMILK CORNBREAD
Printable recipe

Ingredients:

Vegetable oil, for brushing skillet
2 cups stone-ground cornmeal*
½ cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 eggs, lightly beaten
2 cups buttermilk

1/2 cup light sour cream
3 tablespoons butter, melted


Method:


Preheat oven to 400°.
Coat a 10-inch iron skillet with oil, place into oven to heat.**

In a large bowl, whisk the cornmeal with the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
In another bowl, whisk the eggs, buttermilk, sour cream and butter. 

Add the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, stir gently just until combined.
Bake the cornbread for about 20-25 minutes, until golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with a few moist crumbs.
Let cool for a couple of minutes.
Cut into wedges and serve.


*Use regular cornmeal if you wish.
**Or, use an 8-inch square baking pan or a 9x9x1.5-inch, or a 7x11x2-inch baking dish.  Use any pan that will hold 2 quarts:  pour 2 quarts (8 cups) water in your pan and see if it holds the water or not.



Enjoy!


31 comments:

  1. Glad you liked the étouffée! And there should be laws regarding cornbread- real cornbread is not sweet. Ever. For any reason. And since yours is the only good cornbread I can find here it's always a treat when you make it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bubba I'm hoping to see Pam make and post that étouffée recipe. Was raised on the edge of Louisiana and love a good étouffée.

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  2. Hi Son! Thanks! Your étouffée was deeeelicious! ☺ I think that should be a law also. Yep, if you find it in a restaurant here, it's all sweet. You have a really good day! Love

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  3. There is a great line from a movie (I forget the title) disparaging the change in the southern countryside and rural lifestyle and I am paraphrasing it but I am pretty close to the original "One day we are gonna wake up and our cornbread's gonna be sweet and our tea ain't" Whenever I accidentally eat sweet cornbread I think of that line. I agree with Bubba!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love it, Anne! That would be a sad day in the South, sweet cornbread and bitter tea! Funny, funny and I'm wondering what movie. Bubba knows a good thing! ☺ Thanks and take care.

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  4. That looks just as great as my favourite buttermilk scone :-) Now all I need is just a bowl of steaming hot soup for a perfectly satisfying meal :-) Thanks, Pam!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Angie! I'd love to have a buttermilk scone, yum! Glad you like soup and cornbread! Take care

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  5. I will give this a try but it is impossible to gut buttermilk here, have tried manytimes. I will use creme fraiche and hope I get the same result. Have a great week Diane

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Diane! Oh, too bad, buttermilk is so good in breads, salad dressings and so forth. If I don't have buttermilk on hand, I have done the following with good results: Add one tablespoon lemon juice or white vinegar to a liquid measuring cup, and add enough milk until it measures 1 cup. Stir, and let sit for five minutes before using. This buttermilk replacement can also be replicated with non-dairy milks. Hope it helps!

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  6. Pam, This is my kind of cornbread! Firm enough not to crumble and one can actually taste the corn flavor! I slather it was butter and perhaps a dollop of strawberry preserves... Take Care, Big Daddy Dave

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Dave! Yes, I'm all for non-crumbling corn bread. And this one works slathered with butter and blackberry jam for me. Thanks for the visit!

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  7. Love, love, love a good cornbread recipe!

    Yummy.


    M : )

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  8. Your cornbread looks fabulous! I got to give this a try as I have always preferred savoury over sweet cornbreads!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Joyce! Yes, to the savoury! Take care

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  9. I sure agree with your initial saying and my name for sweet cornbread is cake. I also believe good cornbread is about texture and moisture. Yours looks and sounds delicious and I like the sour cream addition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Larry! Every time I've added sour cream to corn bread batter, the corn bread doesn't crumble after baking; maybe, sour cream is the secret. Take care

      Delete
  10. Yum! A warm piece of cornbread on a cold morning tastes so good, Pam. This looks good.

    ~Judy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Judy! Don't think I've ever had cornbread for breakfast. That will be changing soon, sounds like a perfect meal to me! Take care

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  11. I LOVE cornbread! And although I can tolerate sugar in it, you're right -- the best contains absolutely none. Which makes it diet food, right? :-) This looks great -- thanks.

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  12. Yep, you're right, John, diet food! Great that you like cornbread also! Take care

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  13. Love the way you have explained the tips and tricks of a good cornbread....

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  14. Pam, having been raised in Kontz Texas, If'n you were to bring sweet cornbread to a dinner you might of got shot. Now don't misunderstand, my granny used to make a corn flour cake that was very sweet, but that was a cake. Cast iron is the way to go, it even works on induction stove tops. I have my 9" cast iron cornbread skillet reserved for that purpose. Now I'm thinking red beans and rice with proper cornbread. Great post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I get that, Ron! Bet that corn flour cake was good stuff! I love cast iron skillets, cooks great. Red beans and rice, oh my! Thanks for the visit!

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  15. Sounds wonderful with or without sugar (though I'm obviously a northerner with my usual recipe!)

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    Replies
    1. I bet yours is good, Liz! My grandmother made it with sugar and it disappeared quickly. Take care

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  16. What a wonderful corn bread primer, Pam. I apparently am no Yankee b/c I don't like it sweet either.

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    Replies
    1. Ha! Thanks, Debra! I like it your way too. Have a good day!

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    2. I am just reading Buttermilk Graffiti by Edward Lee. He states that another chef, Ronni Lundy (Victuals), taught him NOT to but sugar in his cornbread as well!

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  17. I love cornbread with a piping hot bowl of chili too! Saving your 'real' recipe because I'm certainly a Yankee in the kitchen - LOL.

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● Baking makes me focus … I find it calming and rewarding because, in fairness, it is sort of magic - you start off with all this disparate stuff, such as butter and eggs, and what you end up with is so totally different. And also delicious.
~~~ Marian Keyes

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Hi!
I am happy to hear what you have to say, and appreciate your taking the time to stop by and leave a comment.
Keep smiling!
Pam



You know,

nobody can ever

cook as good as

your Mama.

~ Paula Deen


You know, nobody can ever cook as good as your mama. Paula Deen
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/paula_deen_431843?src=t_cook
You know, nobody can ever cook as good as your mama. Paula Deen
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/paula_deen_431843?src=t_cook

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